Making Science Cool

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sagansense:

The chemical formulas of various substances used to mimic plant-based aromas and flavors. 

Tastes like science.

via jtotheizzoe

(Source: therascalfrommnl, via memewhore)

— 11 months ago with 19563 notes
sagansense:

The physics of beauty requires math. The sunflower has spirals of 21, 34, 55, 89, and - in very large sunflowers - 144 seeds. Each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. This pattern seems to be everywhere: in pine needles and mollusk shells, in parrot beaks and spiral galaxies. After the fourteenth number, every number divided by the next highest number, every number divided by the next highest number results in a sum that is the length-to-width ration of what we call the golden mean, the basis for the Egyptian pyramids and the Greek Parthenon, for much of our art and even our music. In our own spiral-shaped inner ear’s cochlea, musical notes vibrate at a simliar ratio.
The pattern of beauty repeat themselves, over and over.
Yet the physics of beauty is enhanced by a self, a unique, self-organizing system. Scientists now know that a single flower is more responsive, more individual, than they had ever dreamed. Plants react to the world. Plants have ways of seeing, touching, tasting, smelling, and hearing.
Rooted in the soil, a flower is always on the move. Sunflowers are famous for turning toward the sun, east in the morning, west in the afternoon. Light sensitive cells in the stem “see” sunlight, and the stern’s growth orients the flower. Certain cells in a plant see the red end of the spectrum. Other cells see blue and green. Plants even see wavelengths we cannot see, such as ultraviolet.
Most plants respond to touch. The Venus’s-flytrap snaps shut. Stroking the tendril of a climbing pea will cause it to coil. Brushed by the wind, a seedling will thicken and shorten its growth. Touching a planet in various ways, at various times, can cause it to close its leaf pores, delay flower production, increase metabolism, or produce more chlorophyll.
Plants are touchy-feely.
They taste the world around them. Sunflowers use their roots to “taste” the surrounding soil as they search for nutrients. The roots of a sunflower can reach down eight feet, nibbling, evaluating, growing toward the best sources of food. The leaves of some plants can taste a caterpillar’s saliva. They “sniff” the compounds sent out by nearby damaged plants. Research suggests that some by nearly damaged plants. Research suggests that some seeds taste or smell smoke, which triggers germination.
The right sound wave may also trigger germination. Sunflowers, like pea plants, seem to increase their growth when they hear sounds similar to but louder than the human speaking voice.
In other ways, flowers and pollinators find each other through sound. A tropical vine, pollinated by bats, uses a concave petal to reflect the bat’s sonar signal. The bat calls to the flower. The flower responds.
Sharman Apt Russell, Anatomy Of A Rose: Exploring the Secret Life of Flowers

sagansense:

The physics of beauty requires math. The sunflower has spirals of 21, 34, 55, 89, and - in very large sunflowers - 144 seeds. Each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. This pattern seems to be everywhere: in pine needles and mollusk shells, in parrot beaks and spiral galaxies. After the fourteenth number, every number divided by the next highest number, every number divided by the next highest number results in a sum that is the length-to-width ration of what we call the golden mean, the basis for the Egyptian pyramids and the Greek Parthenon, for much of our art and even our music. In our own spiral-shaped inner ear’s cochlea, musical notes vibrate at a simliar ratio.

The pattern of beauty repeat themselves, over and over.

Yet the physics of beauty is enhanced by a self, a unique, self-organizing system. Scientists now know that a single flower is more responsive, more individual, than they had ever dreamed. Plants react to the world. Plants have ways of seeing, touching, tasting, smelling, and hearing.

Rooted in the soil, a flower is always on the move. Sunflowers are famous for turning toward the sun, east in the morning, west in the afternoon. Light sensitive cells in the stem “see” sunlight, and the stern’s growth orients the flower. Certain cells in a plant see the red end of the spectrum. Other cells see blue and green. Plants even see wavelengths we cannot see, such as ultraviolet.

Most plants respond to touch. The Venus’s-flytrap snaps shut. Stroking the tendril of a climbing pea will cause it to coil. Brushed by the wind, a seedling will thicken and shorten its growth. Touching a planet in various ways, at various times, can cause it to close its leaf pores, delay flower production, increase metabolism, or produce more chlorophyll.

Plants are touchy-feely.

They taste the world around them. Sunflowers use their roots to “taste” the surrounding soil as they search for nutrients. The roots of a sunflower can reach down eight feet, nibbling, evaluating, growing toward the best sources of food. The leaves of some plants can taste a caterpillar’s saliva. They “sniff” the compounds sent out by nearby damaged plants. Research suggests that some by nearly damaged plants. Research suggests that some seeds taste or smell smoke, which triggers germination.

The right sound wave may also trigger germination. Sunflowers, like pea plants, seem to increase their growth when they hear sounds similar to but louder than the human speaking voice.

In other ways, flowers and pollinators find each other through sound. A tropical vine, pollinated by bats, uses a concave petal to reflect the bat’s sonar signal. The bat calls to the flower. The flower responds.


Sharman Apt Russell, Anatomy Of A Rose: Exploring the Secret Life of Flowers

(via memewhore)

— 12 months ago with 435 notes
sagansense:


An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait
There’s a school of thought that maintains we humans are mostly just composites of stardust and space matter. But regardless of where you think we came from, it’s probably safe to assume that we didn’t look half as pretty as the celestial portraits Sergio Albiac creates. The Barcelona-based artist‘s most recent project, Stardust Portraits, takes user-submitted photos and transforms the subjects from basic Earthlings to otherworldly cosmic beings. via An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait | Wired Design | Wired.com

via wildcat2030
Brilliant. From the article:
“I’m interested in the effect of chance on human experience,” he explains. “Generative art, which basically outsources artistic and aesthetic decisions, is a fascinating approach to express these kind of concepts. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”
Albiac was curious to explore the heady idea of nucleosynthesis, which is the formation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing cosmic matter. Albiac’s generative project is slightly smaller-scale. So far the artist has created around 1,250 portraits, but eventually, he’d like to produce upwards of 100,000. Albiac’s ultimate goal is for Stardust to be the biggest exhibition of visual art in the universe. “Ideally, this project would run forever, surviving me as creator,” he says. “But on practical terms, I will end it when I won’t be able to maintain it.” Want to help him reach his goal? Check out Albiac’s site for information on how to submit your own photo for a cosmic treatment.

sagansense:

An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait

There’s a school of thought that maintains we humans are mostly just composites of stardust and space matter. But regardless of where you think we came from, it’s probably safe to assume that we didn’t look half as pretty as the celestial portraits Sergio Albiac creates. The Barcelona-based artist‘s most recent project, Stardust Portraits, takes user-submitted photos and transforms the subjects from basic Earthlings to otherworldly cosmic beings. via An Algorithm Uses Galaxies to Draw Your Portrait | Wired Design | Wired.com

via wildcat2030

Brilliant. From the article:

“I’m interested in the effect of chance on human experience,” he explains. “Generative art, which basically outsources artistic and aesthetic decisions, is a fascinating approach to express these kind of concepts. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”

Albiac was curious to explore the heady idea of nucleosynthesis, which is the formation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing cosmic matter. Albiac’s generative project is slightly smaller-scale. So far the artist has created around 1,250 portraits, but eventually, he’d like to produce upwards of 100,000. Albiac’s ultimate goal is for Stardust to be the biggest exhibition of visual art in the universe. “Ideally, this project would run forever, surviving me as creator,” he says. “But on practical terms, I will end it when I won’t be able to maintain it.” Want to help him reach his goal? Check out Albiac’s site for information on how to submit your own photo for a cosmic treatment.

(via memewhore)

— 12 months ago with 384 notes

sagansense:

Republican Tries to Bend Science to Anti-Science Agenda

The new chair of the House of Representatives science committee has drafted a bill that, in effect, would replace peer review at the National Science Foundation (NSF) with a set of funding criteria chosen by Congress. For good measure, it would also set in motion a process to determine whether the same criteria should be adopted by every other federal science agency.

Rep. Lamar Smith - who supported SOPA and blamed gun violence on video games- is continuing the war on science by attempting to remove scientific peer review guidelines and replace it with one determined by Congress…politicizing science. Is this an effort to de-fund science and fund their own corporate propaganda?

Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian break it down.

via TYT (The Young Turks)

- THIS IS WHY SCIENCE LITERACY IS IMPORTANT, FOLKS.

(via memewhore)

— 12 months ago with 481 notes
jodyrobots:

babytarantula:


This is a picture of a Goldschmidt toad that has a mutation that caused its eyes to grow inward into its mouth. Therefore,it needs to open its mouth to see. It was found in a garden in Canada.


what in the fucking fuck nononono

jodyrobots:

babytarantula:

This is a picture of a Goldschmidt toad that has a mutation that caused its eyes to grow inward into its mouth. Therefore,it needs to open its mouth to see. It was found in a garden in Canada.

what in the fucking fuck nononono

(Source: crazyratladee, via pricklylegs)

— 12 months ago with 28279 notes
stoli-martini:

Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It

stoli-martini:

Here’s What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It

(via pricklylegs)

— 12 months ago with 129 notes

Ekso™ is a bionic suit, or exoskeleton, which enables individuals with lower extremity paralysis to stand up and walk over ground with a weight bearing, four point reciprocal gait. Walking is achieved by the user’s forward lateral weight shift to initiate a step. Battery-powered motors drive the legs and replace neuromuscular function.

(via memewhore)

— 12 months ago with 8010 notes
Dolphins Have Names
Dolphins are smart; they can follow recipes, do math, and help others in distress.  New research suggests that they may even have, and respond to, names!  In a study, scientists played the sound of a dolphin’s signature whistle - its name.  The dolphin responded back with the same whistle as if to say, “Yeah, I’m here, wanna go catch some fish?”
Source

Dolphins Have Names

Dolphins are smart; they can follow recipes, do math, and help others in distress.  New research suggests that they may even have, and respond to, names!  In a study, scientists played the sound of a dolphin’s signature whistle - its name.  The dolphin responded back with the same whistle as if to say, “Yeah, I’m here, wanna go catch some fish?”

Source

— 12 months ago with 14 notes
#science  #biology  #dolphins